DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI
DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI
DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI
DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI
DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI
DACI
DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI
DACI
DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI
DACI
DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI
DACI


No Bugs!
8875 Hidden River Parkway, Suite 300, Tampa, FL, USA, 33637
Copyright (c) 2009 Design/Analysis Consultants, Inc.
DESIGN/ANALYSIS NEWSLETTER
3rd Qtr
2009
Dedicated to Design Excellence
Feedback: newsletter@daci-wca.com
OFF TOPIC
Applying engineering thinking to life
Welcome to our new blog, where we'll be posting our Off Topic columns:
TECH TIP
SIGHTINGS: Who Do You Think You Are?
Is There A Fraud On Your Team? (Part 2)
NEWS BULLETS
"According to Scott Viebranz of Kroll, a risk consultancy in New York City, more than 22 percent of the résumés the firm verified in 2007 for technology companies contained misrepresentations of academic credentials. [Because of the economic downturn, Viebranz expects the 2009 stats to be worse.] ... As high as an academic fraud rate of 22 percent sounds, people are even more likely to misrepresent their employment history: More than half of the tech-industry résumés in Kroll's database had such discrepancies."
Let DACI help you toughen up those circuit designs:
RESOURCES
-Analog & Power
-Worst Case Analysis
-Troubleshooting & Problem Solving
-Tradeoff & Risk Assessments
-EMI, EMP, & Lightning
-Noise Control
-Patent & Litigation Assistance
Master the art of design analysis with our Design Analysis Handbook, “…a book that should be on the shelf of every analog or digital electronic system designer."
The DESIGN ANALYSIS HANDBOOK
–Frank Goodenough, Electronic Design
Low-Level Connector Contact Finish
(also applicable to relay and switch contacts)
"Experts Expect Resume Fraud To Rise," by Prachi Patel in the June 2009 IEEE Spectrum
HOME
TOOLS
RESOURCES
REFERENCES
SERVICES
CONTACT
Newsletter content may be copied in whole or part if attribution to DACI is prominently displayed with the copied material.
Sightings is a collection of true experiences as reported by credible sources
As a freshly minted graduate, Charlie was fortunate to share a cubicle with Dave, a sharp engineer who was several years older than Charlie. Over the next couple of years Charlie learned quite a bit from Dave, not all of it pleasant.

For example, when Charlie decided to design and build his own audio amplifier, he proudly showed the final product to Dave. The fact that it was a maze of wiring with components seemingly randomly arrayed was not considered a negative by Dave. A prototype did not have to pass an esthetics test, provided it worked. And Charlie's amplifier did work, as he demonstrated to Dave.

"Sounds pretty good," said Dave. "Now let me take a look at the schematic."

Charlie, glowing in anticipation of Dave's approval, dug out the paper and handed it over. Dave held it up, took the briefest glance, and then smiled. "Well, it won't sound good for long. You've managed to cram almost every violation of good circuit design practice into this one small circuit."

It was an extremely embarrassing moment, but Charlie learned some valuable lessons: just because a design is original does not mean it will be better, and don't slap something together and expect it to work reliably, just because you managed to get the prototype to function. Every good design requires diligent research and analysis.

Thanks to Dave, Charlie buckled down and became an adherent of thorough design practices. In fact, even though he was still a very green engineer, he conceived and --- with the blessings of his department manager --- developed a prototype of an innovative audio multiplexing system. The design worked so well that it was used as the basis for a successful proposal to a military agency.

Charlie was feeling very good about the progress he'd made, knowing that he had finally earned Dave's respect. But to his surprise, not everyone's.

"Who do you think you are?" said the Director of Research and Development, as he barged into Charlie's cubicle.

Charlie was startled as he looked up at the angry face of the senior company executive. "Pardon me?" was all that Charlie could manage to stutter.

The director continued to rant. "Several people with advanced degrees have been working on this multiplexing problem for years. Why do you think you can just come up with a solution, being fresh out of college?"

Charlie's protest, "But it works," was ignored by the director, who continued to chew Charlie out for his effrontery. The director ended his tirade and stormed out of Charlie's office, leaving Charlie trembling in shock --- what had he done?

When Charlie recounted his disturbing experience to Dave, Dave assured Charlie that he had done nothing wrong, except cause some major embarrassment to the R&D group, who unbeknownst to Charlie had been spending large sums of money on the problem that Charlie so quickly and elegantly solved. "As engineers we are supposed to adhere to the scientific method," said Dave, "but we're also human. Unfortunately they don't teach us about these things in college, but you'll find that you will have to spend a good amount of time coping with irrational behavior."

As Charlie continued his career, he was often reminded of the accuracy of Dave's prediction.
Engineering Thinking
How to Protect Your Pocketbook, Your Liberty, and Your Life